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The Best Redesigns of Winter 2024

by Rudy Sanchez on 03/20/2024 | 3 Minute Read

The cold is finally giving way in some parts of the country, and while we're not even three months into 2024, we've already seen several impressive brand refreshes. This winter, the best redesigns came in categories as varied as paint, skincare, non-alcoholic spirits, and food. There’s even a 140-year-old brand that underwent a long overdue refresh, and, yes, people had some feelings about it on social media and elsewhere

Oh, and there were some lions.

So let’s put away the snow shovel, fill those brackets in (no cheating using AI), and dig into some of the best winter brand redesigns of 2024 (and the tail-end of 2023).

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Gush

Singapore-based Gush makes VOC-free paints that passively purify the air in rooms.

Gush recently turned to Eddie Opara and the team at Pentagram to redesign its brand identity and packaging. The update to Gush’s brand balances approachability with science and includes an innovative packaging design that turns into a paint tray that envelops an easy-to-pour standing bag. It's immensely clever and entirely practical.

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Omy

Skincare brand Omy makes personalized serums, creams, gels, and cleansers that address a customer’s specific skincare needs.

Like Gush, Omy reached a point where it’s ready to expand beyond its European home market and decided the time was right for a brand refresh. Omy partnered with design studio Wedge to develop a new brand identity, system, and, better still, refillable packaging.

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Three Spirit

Non-alcoholic alternatives have grown in popularity, and many brands in this space aim to recreate the flavor of spirits like whiskey and gin without the booze. UK-based Three Spirit takes a unique approach to non-alcoholic libations, and instead of emulating popular liquor flavors, they seek to influence the drinker’s mood with formulations that promote sociability, energizing, or winding down.

Domenic Lippa and Pentagram refreshed the brand by elegantly—and artfully—using the themes of alchemy and all things triangles.

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Pomì

Pomì has been scratching that itch for Italian tomato products since 1982. Its range includes pomodori sauced, pureed, strained, juiced, chopped, and as a paste. Given the popularity of Italian cuisine, having tasty tomatoes from Europe’s Boot is a major convenience for those who don’t have the dedication to grow them and then labor all day making Sunday gravy.

This winter, Pomì applied its new brand identity globally. Working with Saatchi & Saatchi (Publicis Groupe) and QNY stateside, the updated look is a contemporized visual feast inspired by, you guessed it, tomatoes.

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Lyle’s Golden Syrup

In 1863, Abram Lyle became the owner of a sugar refinery, which was offered to pay a debt. Noticing that the sugar refining process also yielded a syrup sold cheaply as pig feed, Lyle set forth to create a marketable sweet syrup, eventually succeeding and creating Lyle’s Golden Syrup, a now beloved UK pantry staple.

Notably, the label design featured a lion’s carcass surrounded by bees, a reference to Judges 14:14. Also noteworthy is the longevity of the packaging design, which remained largely unchanged since 1883, making it worthy of a Guinness record.

The new design is decidedly more modern, not a high bar, given that it is 140 years old. A lion’s head with a fanciful mane dominates the front, with a single bee buzzing around. The typography is inspired by the original but refined.

For Brits who are sticklers for tradition, the good news is that the new, modern branding will only be applied to plastic bottles, while the tin will retain the original design, rotting lion carcass and all.

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