Kencko Showcases The Natural Beauty Of Produce With Their Instant Smoothies

by Rudy Sanchez on 05/14/2020 | 2 Minute Read

It’s universally accepted that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is an essential component of good health, but even meeting the recommended five servings a day can prove challenging. Although chock full of vital nutrients, most fruits and vegetables require some preparation, are bulky, and let’s be honest, not the yummiest food to eat for some folks. Even tossing together a smoothie requires more effort than microwaving a burrito or grabbing a danish at the coffee shop.

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Kencko makes smoothies as easy as shaking together a drink with a variety of powdered smoothie packs made from fresh fruit and vegetables sent directly to customers. Kencko’s range includes 12 varieties based on function, such as immunity boost, energy, and brain boost. All the recipes come from organic produce that is flash-frozen, slow-dried, and then blended.

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By freezing and drying, Kencko can fit all the nutrition of a smoothie within a small plastic packet, which is also industrially compostable. The brand labeled the clear tube with the contents, allowing the ingredients’ naturally vibrant colors to shine through. The recyclable mailing box comes adorned with colorful and delectably illustrated produce, creating a playful and inviting experience for consumers. Subscribers also get a handy, reusable shaker for their impending smoothie journey.

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Barcelona agency Love St. Studio developed the branding and packaging, essentially creating the Soylent of the juice world. The name Kencko means “healthy” in Japanese, and the logo emphasizes the quality ingredients, as does the packaging. The brand’s color palette found inspiration in the organic beauty of the fruit and vegetables that make up the smoothies.

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They say that one eats with their eyes first, and if that’s true, Kencko might succeed in getting more people to get their five-a-days worth of fruit and vegetables.

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