Method’s New Bottles Celebrate Women In Design

by Rudy Sanchez on 02/12/2020 | 2 Minute Read

Method is no stranger to featuring stunning art on their signature soap bottles, elevating the hygienic necessity to something worthy of display in the home, incentivizing reuse and refilling. The home goods company has been featured on Dieline several times for good reason, as Method serves as an example of sustainability artfully done, and their latest release continues along that path while also celebrating three talented female designers.

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In collaboration with the Smithsonian Design Museum's Cooper Hewitt Collection, the bottles not only feature three influential women whose work continues to reverberate throughout the world of design, but a fragrance inspired by their art; Marguerita Mergentime’s textile patterns sparked the botanical print and tropical scent of Method’s “Island Rain;” Hungarian-born and US-based Ilonka Karasz, a pioneer in wallcoverings and illustrator of 186 covers for The New Yorker, inspires the fun and folk artsy “Wild Meadows,” a floral aroma; lastly, Barbara White’s colorful and innovative work with Japanese paper informs “Orange Slice,” a citrusy scented soap.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

"We are excited to collaborate with method to celebrate these timeless artists and their work from Cooper Hewitt's vast collection," said Caroline Baumann, Director of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in a press release. "These women transcended the stereotypes of their generations and made a lasting impact on the design world. Showcasing these stunning textiles and drawings from 1930-1970 on the bottles brings powerful design right into homes across America, advancing the public understanding and appreciation of design thinking."

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The limited-edition bottles are available now at Target and the SHOP Cooper Hewitt store, with all sales proceeds from the latter going towards supporting the institution’s mission to “educate, inspire, and empower communities through design.”

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