Not That You Need Another Reason These Days To Drink Vodka, But This One Is Carbon Negative

by Rudy Sanchez on 03/18/2020 | 2 Minute Read

You can typically measure the quality of vodka by what's not in it, and the purest of the brands have an incredibly short ingredient list.

But, what if a vodka could be purer still, so pure that it makes the planet cleaner? And, what if you could do it all with just air, water, and sunlight? The founders of Air Co. set out to create such a spirit, leveraging both science and technology to create what they claim is the world’s first "carbon-negative" spirit.

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Air Co. takes carbon from the air in a process similar to photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide into oxygen and chemical energy stored as carbohydrate molecules. And the electricity to power this process is from a renewable solar source, just like organic photosynthesis. The brand claims that each bottle removes one pound of carbon from the atmosphere, almost the same amount as eight trees in a single day.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

The goal of Air Co. founders Gregory Constantine and Dr. Stafford Sheehan is to make beautifully designed, brand forward products that do good for the planet, starting with their vodka. Dr. Sheenan himself is a Ph.D. chemist from Yale University, as well as an expert in carbon dioxide conversion and artificial photosynthesis.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

The same care for the environment extends to Air Co. vodka’s packaging. The company worked with Joe Doucet x Partners to create a bottle that is reusable and recyclable, one that could also showcase the purity of Air Co.’s vodka. The labels are affixed to the bottles using a special glue that is not only non-toxic but comes off cleanly, making the containers easier to reuse. The printing is carbon-offset with tree planting in Central and South America.

Making a premium vodka is challenging enough, but to make one that reduces greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is something worth toasting.

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