Convenience Store Gogo's Packaging Gets Some 8-Bit Inspiration From Meat Studio

by Rudy Sanchez on 04/26/2022 | 2 Minute Read

Being a gamer in China can be challenging. The government keeps tight control on the industry, and Chinese gamers are only allowed to play titles approved by the government. Minors under 18 are only allowed to play video games three hours a week, between 8 PM-9 PM, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. For adults, playing video games too long or spending too much money on them can mean points deducted from their “social credit” score, a low enough score could result in travel and purchase bans or even having your dog taken away.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Beijing Subway’s convenience store brand Gogo still went with a video-game-inspired visual identity for its on-the-go goods, despite gaming being described through state-affiliated media as “spiritual opium.” 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Superbly designed by Meat Studio, the packaging injects fun into generally mundane commutes. The bright, 8-bit graphics found inspiration with in-game “buffs” or items that give players a boost in things like health, power, speed, or ammunition. Graphics like hearts and stars will be familiar to even casual or long-retired gamers, and some packaging features 8-bit versions of the food, beverage, or protein inside. The graphics are cheery and visually describe the product quickly for instant consumer recognition.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

In addition to adding a little extra fun to picking up a coffee or snack when you're on the run, Gogo’s packaging lets customers experience a little bit of gaming without taking a hit to their social credit score.


Images courtesy of Meat Studio.

Editorial photograph

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