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Mosaic Gives Jamaican Patty Brand Stush A 'Proper ' Refresh

by Rudy Sanchez on 07/21/2021 | 2 Minute Read

The Caribbean nation of Jamaica is home to about 3 million people. The Jamaican diaspora happens to also be about the same size, having left home and established roots across the globe. The result is hotbeds for Jamaican culture abroad, particularly in countries like the UK, the United States, and Canada. Jamaican originals like reggae and dub or dishes like jerk chicken have gained fans the world over, extending the island’s culture thousands of miles away. 

Another Jamaican specialty that has won over many is the island’s patty, a flaky and buttery turnover with a savory and spicy filling known for its distinct yellow crust.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Stush is a patty purveyor in the Greater Toronto Area committed to making quality and tasty patties with various fillings. The brand recently underwent a refresh, working with Mosaic North America. Jamaican slang for “proper,” Stush’s refresh found inspiration in classic dance hall posters but deftly avoids tired, tread-worn Jamaican tropes and stereotypes.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

The bright color palette across the visual identity serves as an excellent and vibrant backdrop for superb photos of the patties and accompanying garnishes, shot by Paula Wilson. Though inspired by dancehall posters, the front of the retail packaging is also reminiscent of album covers. The wordmark’s type is bombastic and fun and cleverly complemented by a graphic pattern made up of half-circles similar to the food itself. Other fun graphics include a hand holding a patty “properly,” that is, the pinkie finger extended, a playful call back to the Stush’s etymology.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Using Jamaica as inspiration, Stush’s new branding uses bright colors, fun graphics, and assertive typography to express the warmth and friendliness of the Caribbean nation without resorting to the Jamaican flag, references to Rastafarianism, or the beach.

Editorial photograph

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