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Get Dizzie With This Zero Waste Grocery Service’s Fossil-Free Packaging Designed By Blond

by Chloe Gordon on 10/06/2022 | 3 Minute Read

While living a zero-waste lifestyle is possible, it's a way of life that isn't easy by any stretch of the imagination. The lifestyle is especially difficult when grocery shopping at a traditional supermarket is involved, as you'll soon find plastic waste in everything from vegetable packaging to ice cream pints. 

To reduce shoppers' carbon footprints, grocery service Dizzie, previously known as Good Club, has launched reusable, fossil-fuel-free packaging designed by Blond

Dizzie tapped Blond's design team to develop a packaging system that is both long-lasting and 100% recyclable at the end of life. The biggest goal, however, was that the packaging system would also need to be decanted or stored for later collection. That way, it could be washed and sanitized by Dizzie and later reused by future customers. 

The goal of this circular system was to allow customers to buy their essentials without any packaging waste, helping cut billions of pieces of plastic from supermarket shelves. While glass is ultimately more sustainable than plastic, Dizzie still had to ensure that the packaging system could get easily shipped without excess weight or breakage. 

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"A lot of people picture reusable packaging purely as glass mason jars taken to zero waste stores, and meanwhile, think of plastic as the enemy," states James Melia, founder and creative director at Blond. "For a delivery service, different priorities apply, such as reducing the weight of the packaging, which has a massive impact on emissions and designing something resilient that can withstand being thrown into the back of a van." To ensure this, the brand commissioned a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) that proved that plastic would be more sustainable in the long term than glass or metal, provided it would get reused many times over.

Blond worked to create packaging using a biocomposite made from wood fibers, a derivative of the forest industry, and bio-PP, produced from waste and residue oils. "We had to carefully position the design so that, on the one hand, it was clear the packaging was not disposable and should not be chucked out," says James. "On the other hand, it couldn't be so decorative or homeware-like that people might get tempted to keep them and not bother returning." 

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Because of this innovative thinking, Dizzie's containers are made from 98% renewable materials allowing them to get used for up to 100 cycles. After they reach their end of use, the storage pots are sent back to the manufacturer and made into new pots, helping enable Dizzie's closed-loop system. 

"It's great to collaborate with a brand that shares the same objectives," mentions James. "We strive to rethink how we live, consume and interact with everyday products and, where appropriate, create a more sustainable alternative. With Dizzie, a simple pot could have a monumental impact; we have calculated that if everyone bought 10% of their weekly shop in reusable packaging, we'd save 19.4 billion pieces of plastic a year. As a design agency, that is a fantastic journey to be a part of."

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Beyond the remarkable sustainability aspect, the identity system for Dizzie features design from Nice & Serious, adding an extra dose of satisfaction and charm that brings the refillable grocery brand to life. Anthony Orozco designed the brand's illustrated characters, splashed across all the brand's touchpoints. Each graphic creates an instant sense of charm while also creating a visual way for consumers to remember the brand. 

So while being waste-free isn't easy, Dizzie eases the burden for consumers wanting to make more sustainable choices. And with branding this cheerful, being sustainable is more pleasant than ever.  

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Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph