DEADLINE ALERT - EXTENDED UNITL FRIDAY

EADEM's 'Bare Skin Confidence' For Women of Color Proudly Gets Displayed On Packaging

by Chloe Gordon on 07/06/2021 | 4 Minute Read

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The beauty industry has a range of issues, from sustainability to inclusivity. While some brands are turning a blind eye to these issues, others tackle them head-on, creating products designed for often overlooked consumers.

Enter EADEM, a beauty brand created for the BIPOC community with concerns regarding hyperpigmentation by creating a serum that targets dark spots without lightening the rest of the skin. EADEM realizes that melanin—your natural skin pigment—isn't the enemy, despite the beauty industry treating it as if it were. 

Founders Marie Kouadio Amouzame and Alice Lin met while working at Google. The two frequently discussed their skincare routines, products they used, and their struggle with outbreaks and beauty annoyances. Together, they realized that they often had to adjust to fit the needs of their skin and soon realized many women had to do the same as well.

Editorial photograph

Editorial photograph

The bulk of Alice's career was spent as a brand marketing executive at Google, but then decided to take a giant leap, "I took a "crazy" risk to become a beginner again and went back to school to study graphic design," she admits. "It was an amazing and exhausting experience in the best way, and I got some recognition from The One Club for my time too. So when I thought about the next step in my career, I focused on building brands from the early stages. Not only helping to define a product story and what a brand should stand for, but also shape how this gets realized through visual design." 

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They chose the brand name EADEM (pronounced ee-dem) to promote inclusivity as, in Latin, EADEM means "the same or all." "EADEM exists for a wide spectrum of women of color across many cultures, ethnicities, and skin colors—so it was important to us that everything from our logo to color and casting pushes against preconceived cultural stereotypes," Alice says. 

Above all, they wanted to create skincare for women of color that's beautiful enough to keep on top of the vanity, rather than something you tuck away in the closet or underneath your sink.

The packaging system is unique in that the bright and vibrant outer box intentionally juxtaposes the elegant and minimalistic bottle. While the avoidance of cliche color palettes was essential to the branding system, the choice of an orange box is striking and energetic while still maintaining a touch of neutrality. "There's plenty of room for 'ands.' We can be modern women of color and still hold on to our cultural heritage," says Alice.

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"The identity celebrates the many facets of the EADEM woman," she adds. "She's simultaneously strong and soft, holding her unique self without losing sight of her heritage. This duality is embodied in a logo that seems angular at first glance but contains soft shapes upon closer examination. The hand-drawn logo has a distinct personality that emphasizes the idea that these are products made for you. A large, unapologetic logo taking over the surfaces it's on imbues a confidence EADEM strives to help our customers find—bare-skin confidence." That duality also comes into play with the typography, a mix of serif and sans serif, balancing playfulness and sophistication.

While finding that harmony, Marie and Alice, along with the help of designer and art director Lotta Nieminen, have created a packaging system that's bold and ready-made for retail. It's also a brand that the marketplace needed, and they've already won a Glossier Grant for Black-Owned Businesses and are a part of the Sephora Accelerate program.

EADEM is a product made for you that you'll be just as happy to showcase in your bathroom. And if the packaging alone wasn't enough to sell you, it's a product that'll give your skin that glazed donut glow that we're all so desperately seeking. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

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