HERE Studio Unveils Its Canned Tepache De La Calle

by Bill McCool on 01/18/2021 | 3 Minute Read

Tepache is a fermented beverage dating back to Pre-Columbian Mexico made from the skins of pineapples. All you need to do is slice off the rinds and throw them in some water with a little cinnamon and unrefined brown sugar. Variations abound when it comes to spices, but that’s the general principle. It’s the kind of refreshing beverage you’ll find sold among street vendors down Mexico way, and with an average ABV of less than 2%, it certainly won’t get you crazy. However, you can combine it with your favorite light Cerveza or some tequila for a warm-weather cocktail.

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And by all accounts, it’s delicious (and I’ll be able to confirm in the next few days as I have a batch fermenting on my counter as we speak). Of course, if you don’t want to go the traditional route and wait the very necessary 24-48 hours to pass over at your personal fermentation station, you could try a sparkling probiotic take by De La Calle.

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Editorial photograph

Developed by HERE Studio founder Alex Matthews, De La Calle brings the beloved traditional Mexican staple to the Whole Foods set. Using an authentic recipe from a 3rd generation tepache maker Rafael Martin Del Campo, the fermented pineapple drink with zero booze will be one of the first to get markets here in the US. The beverage will launch in five flavors, Orange Turmeric, Ginger Manzana, Mango Chile, Tamarind Citrus, and Pineapple Spice.

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The visual identity taps into Mexican street vendor culture and the studio found inspiration in food carts, street art, and vintage wrestling posters, all the things that make Mexico’s history and landscape as vivid and bold as it is. The brazen colors look to the country’s architecture and what they called “the lost art of traditional sign painting,” with all of its quirky imperfections. Still, the packaging feels contemporary, with fun alternating typefaces and plenty of tony exclamation points.

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Editorial photograph

So, will 2021 be the year of tepache? Time will tell, but throwing down a few bucks for a can of De La Calle beats waiting for your science experiment to bear fruit, though likely not as rewarding.

You can order De La Calle directly from the source here, but it’s also available now in Southern California, with a national rollout coming later in the year.

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Photos by: Jack Strutz

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