The Real Star Of Equiano Rum Is Its Elegant Bottle Design

by Bill McCool on 10/06/2020 | 3 Minute Read

For the world's first African and Caribean rum, the founders of Equiano looked to the past in creating their brands. What's more, they created an understated yet elegant bottle design along with minimal branding that will stand out on any bar cart.


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In 2019, co-founder and brand and marketing Director Aaisha Dadral set out to create the principle design principles for The Equiano Rum Co. based on two simple goals; make good rum, and do good things. Everything from the shape of the bottle, the font, and various quirks within the typeface (such as the 'Q' in the logo) to the color of the label was done with great intention. 

Rum making is an age-old craft, and many brands have been around for a long time. Dadral and her Co-Founders wanted the Equiano Rum bottle to stand out against the vast majority of its peers. 

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"Like most spirits, rum has bottle shapes that feel right for the category or rather, that brands are more likely to look to,” says Dadral. But as an independently owned brand, the design process had to consider the company’s budget as well as the brand’s identity.

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Editorial photograph

As the world’s first African and Caribbean rum, the Equiano liquid challenges a centuries-old craft. It's a bold move, but the founders believe in their approach. Made without any added spices, colorants, or additives, Equiano Rum is 100% natural and pure. The Equiano Rum spirit began its journey at Gray’s Distillery in Mauritius, a small island off the coast of Madagascar, where it gets aged for ten years alongside an 8-year aged rum from Foursquare, a distillery helmed by industry titan Richard Seale.

the Gray's 10-year aged African rum is blended with an 8-year aged rum from Foursquare

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The company is named after 18th Century entrepreneur, author, freedom fighter, and abolitionist Olaudah Equiano. His memoir detailing his experiences as a slave in the transatlantic trade helped bring awareness to the realities of the practice and, eventually, the passing of the British Slave Trade Act of 1807 which abolished slavery in the British empire. What’s more, Olaudah purchased his freedom from the money he made selling rum! The company’s founders had found a story that mirrored that of the rum, so they knew then that Equiano would be part of the brand name and narrative.

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In his name, the co-founders have established The Equiano Rum Co. Foundation, which will donate 5% of all company profits and $2 of every bottle sold on their website to racial equity and freedom fighting organizations.

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