Hip Hop Meets Artisanal Pork Crackling

by Andrew Gibbs on 11/04/2019 | 2 Minute Read

Designed by Auckland based Supply, Libby’s Pork Crack is an artisanal range of small-batch, additive-free pork crackling with everything from cooking to packing done by hand. Already established, the brand had a dedicated following amongst Keto & Crossfit audiences, however growth had plateaued. New opportunities had arisen through a boutique supermarket chain placement, and Supply were approached to help reach a new Foodie audience through a brand and packaging evolution.

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Their founder, Libby, had imbued the brands messaging with a love of Hip Hop through witty references to 90’s gangster rap. Playful phrases made the bridge between Hip Hop and the brand: e.g. their mascot “Piggy Smalls”.

We embraced this and built a visual language that appealed to Foodies. Rather than focusing on gangster rap, we looked for broader appeal via early hip hop. We identified an intersection between the handmade nature of the product, and DIY art of early hip hop.

Supply

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"We embraced this and built a visual language that appealed to Foodies. Rather than focusing on gangster rap, we looked for broader appeal via early hip hop. We identified an intersection between the handmade nature of the product, and DIY art of early hip hop. Referencing this rich visual culture, handmade illustrations were created in collaboration with Margaux Shand from Hey Stranger and featured throughout the brand world via a cut’n’paste sampling ethos; they’re made to be rearranged to create energetic new compositions."

Editorial photograph

From the illustration collection Supply created montages that energetically jump on-shelf, and entice further investigation with loads of discovery elements; electrified boom boxes, cheeky album parental advisory stickers etc. This approach also allowed them to integrate key typographic call-outs: “Gluten Free”, “Handmade”, and ethical points; that its pigs live happy “Cage-Free” lives on “Free Farms”. And as a final touch, the illustrations are brought to life online via stop-frame animation and bursts of colour, referencing early low-fi animated hip hop music videos.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

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