DIELINE AWARD WINNERS REVEALED

Concepts We Wish Were Real

by Elizabeth Freeman on 06/03/2016 | 12 Minute Read

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Celebrate the end of the week with The Dieline and get inspired by this week's top Concepts We Wish Were Real! 


Dunkin Donuts

Student

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Dunkin Donuts was established 1950 in Massachusetts and in 2014 they opened up their first store in Sweden. We saw an opportunity to update Dunkin Donuts visual identity and packaging to fit into the Scandinavian market as well as the global. We wanted to make donuts trendy and fun, visiting the café is supposed to be an experience and donuts is something you treat yourself with in between gym sessions and healthy eating. The new design goes back to the basics. Bright colors, geometric shapes and a simplified logo makes the communication straightforward and easy to comprehend. For recognition we have chosen to use a bright pink as a primary color. As secondary colors we have worked with blue, pink and yellow. They are used together to create a pattern with overprint. User friendly and fun describes the new packaging. The boxes with four donuts can be stacked on top of each other and together with the donut shaped handle you can easily bring twelve donuts with you. The mug and donut holder is perfect for bringing your beverage and donut on the go. With an expression that communicates fun, simple and playful we have expanded Dunkin Donuts already existing target group and turned it into an exciting experience. We have transformed Dunkin Donuts from a fast food restaurant to a cool and modern café that gives you an experience without being expensive. It is a place you visit with your friends to hang out, relax and have fun.

Designed by Hanna Sköld, Sara Knipström

Country: Sweden

KEFIR

Student

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Kefir is a nutrient-rich fermented beverage made with milk and kefir grains, which has been consumed in Russia and Central Asia for over hundred years. However, it is only recently that it has gained popularity in Europe, Japan, and the United States. This conceptual packaging design is meant, above all, to emphasize the qualities of the drink itself. The transparent glass vessel and translucent labels let the consumer see the contents, the color, and the texture of the kefir while still communicating the high-quality of the brand. Kefir is offered as plain traditional drink as well as with several juices mixture.

Designed by Mansur Makhmudov

Country: United States

A L'Olivier

Student

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For this project I chose A L’Olivier as the parent brand. I designed an identity and used a packaging structure that maintains the classic styling as well as the traditional feel of the brand by replacing the current tin with a package that is more recognizable to a wider audience. The package gives the consumer the feel of an established product without seeming dated. For the label, I stripped the complicated current design down to its essence to make it more appealing on the shelf without losing the authenticity of the brand. The label is more modern and streamlined allowing the consumer to easily find it on the shelf and identify what it is. The color palette gives the consumer further clarification as to the contents of the infused oils without overpowering the brand.

Designed by Ana Paulsen

Photography by Don Paulsen

Country: United States

Cutty Sark - Celebrating 15 years

Concept

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Created in 1923, with an emblematic hand-drawn ship used as its logotype. The hardships on recreating such an iconic figure for its 15th birthday was a true challenge. Delicate lines complement the strong printed sea illustration on the ribbon and box, combined with a strong, serifed font creating a young but also classic and appealing look for all ages. Cantino was based on the Cantino planisphere or the also called world map showing portuguese geographic discoveries in the east and west. Named after Alberto Cantino, who successfully smuggled it from Portugal to Italy in 1502. It was valuable at the beginning of the16th century because it showed detailed and up-to-date strategic information in a time when geographic knowledge of the world was growing at a fast pace. It contains unique historical information about the maritime exploration and the evolution of nautical cartography. The Cantino planisphere is the earliest extant nautical chart where places are depicted according to their astronomically observed latitudes. Assessing all aspects of the old branding and by focusing on the key points of difference, were the first things to take into consideration for a stronger and younger looking design. However, it was crucial to maintain the brand's identity evoking the thoughts of adventure. The bold yellow color has been mixed with a bright white matching the front label and involving its logotype, creating a higher degree of visibility. The green glass has been converted into two versions, a simple bright see through and a classic black with a matte finish. Both have a ribbon symbolizing the vast sea, such as the package side illustrations, giving it a younger look by indulging a strong orange into the typography.

Designed by Soraia Festa

Creative Director: Soraia Festa & Rafael Sousa

3D & Lightning: Rafael Sousa

Country: Portugal 

Akila

Student

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Akila partners with local artists and artisans in Cameroon to create a sense of community and offer an international platform for their artwork. One of a kind, hand made products are distributed at a Manhattan storefront and all proceeds go back to the artist and their country. Akila is a monochromatic brand to remind us that no matter where we are from, our creative purpose is the same — to make and to give.

Designed by Evan Tolleson

Teacher: Thomas McNulty

Country: United States

ZERO

Concept

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When using a foam cleanser, people tend to press the center to squeeze the cleanser out from the container. Therefore, when it is almost used, people use various ways to push the content to the bottom such as strongly shaking it up and down or rolling it. Sometimes people even cut the container to use the last bit of the cleanser. The item "ZERO" was created in order to resolve these matters to offer fun, easy, and convenient experience for the users. It is designed to use the centrifugal force in which the user spins the bottle to push the contents to the bottom for easy access of the content. The "ZERO" embraces intuitive and yet emotional design.

Squeezing out the very small remaining foam cleanser with little effort and work is the main characteristic of "ZERO". The users of the product like foam cleanser often experience discomfort and inconvenience when there is a small amount left in the container. The principle of centrifugal force is a resolution in changing discomfort and inconvenience for your effortless and fun experience. The users can prudently use the cleanser by swirling the bottle with the finger to push the contents towards the end.

No need to frawn anymore because you can’t squeeze out your leftover cleanser! “ZERO”, enjoy to the last drop.

Designed by Yongwoo Shimdonghwi chang

Country: South Korea

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